header image
 

Emergency

Like most people, I’ve been aware of the terrible flooding in Brisbane, Australia due to the constant media coverage, but it’s only been the last couple of days I’ve bothered to watch some of the footage.

My SIL lives and works in Brisbane so when my MIL expressed her concern about her daughter’s safety, I started to email a few friends in that part of the world. I wanted to check on my friends and see if we could find out just how bad the floods were in my SIL’s neighbourhood.
It turns out my SIL lives in an apartment quite a distance from any rivers, so her home should be okay. She works in town though and her office is flooded and has been evacuated.
It seems the main problem is panic buying in the supermarkets and shops. Staples, such as bottled water and baked beans, are pretty much sold out and no one knows quite when or how more food will be delivered.
Anyhow, the videos show cars and boats being swept away in the strong, muddy currents but along with that there are videos of animals swimming aimlessly around. Horses and cows are shown but thousands of domestic pets, along with wildlife have been caught up in this disaster.
Many evacuees have had to leave their beloved pets behind to fend for themselves. Imagine how heartbreaking that must be?
It has reminded me that although it’s unlikely to have a flooding -related disaster where we live, the unexpected does happen and it’s wise to do what we can to plan for it. Even just making sure you have an extra few days of pet food available at all times and always knowing where your cat carriers and dog leads are, could make a real difference in an emergency, even if it’s just on a small scale.
In the meantime, I’ll join in with the collective breath holding as everyone waits for the rain to stop and the water level to drop in a city 10,000 miles away.